Dexter is an adorable one-year-old red and white Basenji boy currently located in Illinois. Whether he is running around the backyard at full speed or tossing his favorite stuffed animal into the air, Dexter loves to play. When it comes to having fun, the more the merrier, as Dexter loves to play with the resident Basenjis. His fun-loving attitude is contagious, and even the elder Basenji in the house chases Dexter and plays with him. Dexter brings out their puppy behavior.

Dexter came into BRAT as one of the youngest members of eight Basenjis that were transferred to BRAT from the National Mill Dog Rescue in Missouri. He arrived in his foster home scared and skittish of humans but has made remarkable progress in his first month.

After five nights in a kennel and a long drive with multiple strangers, Dexter arrived in his new foster home overwhelmed and scared. His foster carried his crate into the house and set it down in a small room with a gate in the hallway separating Dexter from these new strangers and Basenjis. After watching from his crate for a couple of hours, Dexter slowly ventured out of the crate and down the hallway. He did not know these strange people and had never been in this house. He made his way down the hallway to sniff the resident Basenjis through the gate. After a few minutes, he could not contain himself, he had to meet these new dogs! He pushed down the gate and immediately started playing with them.

Dexter is learning how to be a puppy and does the traditional play bow with his paws on the ground and Basenji butt in the air. He jumps on the couch and paws at the resident Basenjis to get them to play. He chews on bones and plays with toys, but don’t be surprised to see the bones slowly disappearing as he takes them out to the backyard. He loves to do his boney dance where he rears up and pounces on bones and then spins around into doggy down. In typical Basenji fashion, he tears the stuffing out of toys. His favorite toy is a stuffed fox which he carries with him everywhere - out to the backyard, tossing it in the air, running around the yard carrying it, and then back through the doggy door into the house with it.

Though Dexter quickly warmed up to the resident Basenjis, his progress with humans has been slower. In the first week he stayed near his pen and cage while getting accustomed to his new surroundings. In the second week he started coming into the living room with the rest of the pack and now sleeps on the floor while the humans and resident Basenjis occupy the furniture. Dexter continues to make progress every day with his new life.

When on leash Dexter will let his foster humans pet him, and he will lay down in his cage and let them pet him. He will approach them and smell their hands or take treats from them. He will follow his humans around the house watching them as they go about their business. He is slowly getting closer and closer to these scary humans as time goes on.

Even though he arrived skittish and scared of humans, noises never bothered him – thunderstorms, sirens, loud music. In fact, the local warning sirens are triggered every day at noon, and Dexter loves to barooo to the sound.

Potty training is going well but his new home will need to continue to work on it. He has never pooped in the house, and he never goes in his cage or in the area sectioned off around his cage. The doggy door is propped open, and he runs in and out to the backyard to do his business. Occasionally, he will have an accident inside the house, so his new home should continue to work with him. He loves to run around the yard and will run outside by himself to chase squirrels and explore the yard or to lay on the deck and soak up some sun. His foster has a privacy fence which keeps him secure in the yard.

Dexter learns daily how to become a typical Basenji by watching his canine companions. He loves the resident Basenjis and there has never been a fight between them. Unlike a typical Basenji, he does not bother the resident cat who is Basenji savvy. At most he will sniff her as she walks by. He eats dry dog food twice a day and is fed with the resident Basenjis. In fact, their three bowls are lined up on the floor with all of them eating at the same time, and there is never a problem. All three Basenjis will switch bowls and eat from each other’s bowls without an issue. He is still adjusting and slowly getting accustomed to eating in front of humans. If his foster puts down his dog food and watches him, he will grab a bite of food and then run around the kitchen, then continue over and over until his food is gone.

His foster has seen flashes of counter surfing. Dexter is a tall, long-legged Basenji, so counters will need to be cleaned off when he gains the confidence to surf like a typical Basenji. As he continues to gain confidence and feel comfortable around humans, then typical Basenji mischief may emerge. Dexter came to BRAT with the name Puppy, so basically no name. His foster named him Dexter, and he learned his name quickly. His foster works with him on cues – come and good boy.

Dexter’s perfect home would have a canine companion to give him confidence as he learns how to be the best Basenji that he can be. A bonus would be a secure, enclosed backyard for Dexter to run and play, but not a necessity. Since he loves to be around his pack and has been around Basenjis all his life, then having someone (canine or human) around most of the time would be ideal.

Even though Dexter is not fully comfortable around humans, he loves to be around humans and dogs. He will pace in his pen when left alone but he has never been destructive. His new humans will need to be patient with him and give him the space to become comfortable with them.

He is so adorable that it is hard not to scoop him up and cuddle him, but he will need his space to approach when he is ready. Experience with a shy, skittish Basenji is a plus. Dexter has come a long way in a short amount of time, but he needs to continue to work on his potty training and socialization with people. His new family must show him that humans are not scary, and he will blossom into a wonderful Basenji.

If you think you could provide Dexter with love, activity, and evening cuddle time, please read the data sheet below carefully, complete the BRAT adoption form (if you have not previously done so) and contact the BRAT coordinator, Brooke Stephens.

The coordinator's link will take you to a form that will ask you your name, email address, the city and state you live in, why this dog is perfect for your family, a typical day in your household, and, if applicable, how you plan to transport Dexter.

There is an adoption fee of $400.00 for Dexter. This fee is used for the extensive costs associated with vetting and otherwise caring for Dexter and future Basenjis in rescue. BRAT adopters receive a dog that has been spayed or neutered, fully vaccinated, treated for fleas and internal worms if necessary, DNA tested for Fanconi syndrome (dogs under 10), and heartworm tested. Our dogs get recommended dental work. When indicated, we test our dogs for thyroid deficiencies. They are also temperament evaluated. In addition, BRAT provides free lifetime post-adoption counseling to help deal with behavioral or health issues. Finally, we provide a free lifetime identification tag connected to our "lost dog" toll free number.

ABOUT THIS BRAT BASENJI
Dog's name: Dexter
Dog is currently in: Illinois
Birth date: 01/12/2023
Gender: Male
Color: Red and White
Weight: 24 pounds
Neutered/Spayed: Neutered on 05/10/24
Tattooed: No
Micro-chipped: Yes

VACCINATIONS AND MEDICAL TESTS
General health information: Dexter is a healthy Basenji with no health issues. He did well at his vet visits and the vet handled him all over without issue. He did get anxious near the end of the appointment and would run to the door and back to his foster, back and forth.
DA2PPv (distemper, adenovirus, parainfluenza, and parvovirus): 5/22/24
Rabies: 4/12/2024 (1 year)
Rabies certificate: Yes
Coronavirus: Negative
Bordetella: Vaccinated on 4/30/24
Lyme Disease: Negative
Fecal: Tested on 4/30/24
Fecal test comments: Negative
Heartworm: 4/30/24, negative
Regular heartworm given: Yes 5/3/24
Urine tested for Fanconi: N/A
DNA test for Fanconi: Clear/Normal
Other tests: Basic blood work all fine
Other regular medication: None
Other medical issues: None

EATING HABITS
Eating schedule: Twice a day
Type of food: Dry
Brand(s) of food: Pure Balance Salmon
Begs for food: No
Food dislikes: None
Favorite foods: Chicken and peanut butter which can be used to conceal any medication that he needs to take. He also likes cheese, bologna, chips and dip.
Feeding instructions: Dry food in a bowl, sometimes add cooked chicken. His heartworm pill is thrown into his dry dog food, and he eats it without hesitation. Since he loves running and playing in the backyard, it can be hard to get him to come inside. Feeding him a late dinner brings him in, and then his foster closes the doggy door to keep him inside.

TEMPERAMENT
Dexter loves to play and have fun. We suspect he was not socialized with humans in his previous home, but he has made great progress in his foster home. His foster will be returning to the office soon, and Dexter will be alone for five days a week after that. This will be the perfect opportunity for him to move to his new home. He is a very sweet boy, and he needs a family that will give him time to become comfortable with them at his pace. In return, you will get a wonderful Basenji boy.
Lived with children: No
Likes children: Unknown, but we suspect the activity of young children might make him nervous.
Lived with cats: Yes
Likes cats: Yes, he does not chase the cat however the cat is Basenji savvy
Lived with dogs: Yes
Likes dogs: Yes, prefers to be around other dogs. Dexter gains confidence and learns from other dogs, so he should have a canine companion in his new home.
Prefers men or women: Fine with both, but shy around humans in general. Dexter’s new home should continue to work on socializing him with people.
Likes strangers: Dexter is shy and skittish around strangers, so his new home should slowly introduce him to strangers and instruct them to wait for Dexter to approach them.
Nips (playfully): No
Bites (in anger): Never
Crate trained: Yes. Dexter is comfortable in a crate and considers it his sanctuary.
House broken: He has made great progress with potty training, but his new family should continue to watch him closely. He does not go to the bathroom in his crate or pen area and does well using the doggy door to the backyard. He has never pooped in the house, but he does occasionally have an accident. With positive reinforcement and calmness, he should continue to improve.
Destructive outdoors: No
Dog is a climber: No
Easily startled: No
Rides well in car: Yes
Gets carsick: No
Rides in crate: Yes
Yodels: Yes, every day when the local sirens are tested, he yodels to the sound.
Screams: No
Dog sleeps where: In his crate with the door closed but not locked, next to his foster’s bed.
Other information: Dexter does fine on a leash but needs some practice and has only been walked alone. Having a canine companion for walks might improve his leash skills as he learns from the other dog. He likes to be around people and dogs and will pace when left alone. He is not destructive, but he will pace until his humans return home. Dexter will come with a 30-inch crate, an escape proof harness, a 15-foot recall lead, and a new Martingale collar.

If you are interested in Dexter, please use our coordinator contact form, to email our BRAT coordinator, Brooke Stephens. Thank you!

There is an adoption fee of $400.00 for Dexter. This fee is used for the extensive costs associated with vetting and otherwise caring for Dexter and future Basenjis in rescue. BRAT adopters receive a dog that has been spayed or neutered, fully vaccinated, treated for fleas and internal worms if necessary, DNA tested for Fanconi syndrome (dogs under 10), and heartworm tested. Our dogs get recommended dental work. When indicated, we test our dogs for thyroid deficiencies. They are also temperament evaluated. In addition, BRAT provides free lifetime post-adoption counseling to help deal with behavioral or health issues. Finally, we provide a free lifetime identification tag connected to our "lost dog" toll free number.